Skip to content

Achim Szepanski: Kapitalisierung Bd. I & II

Review on:

Kapitalisierung Bd. 1: Marx’ Non-Ökonomie

Kapitalisierung Bd. 2: Non-Ökonomie des gegenwärtigen Kapitalismus

Achim Szepanski

Hamburg: Laika, 2014 1)This article is a longer version of a review I wrote for Marx & Philosophy. Link: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/reviews/2015/2050

 

I. Beyond Marxology: Coming Out of the German Box

Achim Szepanki’s trilogy Kapitalisierung (Capitalisation) may be the most important publication on Marxist economy in the German-speaking world since Robert Kurz’ Schwarzbuch Kapitalismus) (The Black Book of Capitalism) (1999). To understand this claim one has to know that for the last decades German-speaking Marxist discourse has been more or less completely dominated by the ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ (New Marx-Reading), a school of Marxology that has been founded by Hans-Georg Backhaus, Helmut Reichelt, Michael Heinrich, Robert Kurz, and others. 2)As the founding text of ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ one can count Reichelt’s dissertation Zur logischen Struktur des Kapitalbegriffs bei Karl Marx (On the Logical Structure of the Concept of Capital in Karl Marx) (2001) from 1968, first published in 1970. It has become the standard reading of Marx within leftist German-speaking academia since the late 90s, important protagonists being the group around the mentioned Robert Kurz and his journal Krisis and Michael Heinrich, whose introduction into the Capital, Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Eine Einführung (Critique of Political Economy. An Introduction) (2005), first published in 2004, became the standard introduction to Marx’ Capital within few years. Under this label they have established a reading of Marx’ Capital which is strongly focused on the book’s first four chapters in which Marx is said to have developed a structural critique of the form of capitalist socialisation with the logically connected forms of value, money, commodity, and the fetishism of these forms as its structural core. The whole rest of the book is understood as a mere development of this fundamental structure, which many even see as a superfluous and nowadays irrelevant appendix. One is justified in suspecting that the ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ is, in its essence, more or less a renewal of the classical Western Marxist reading of Marx as introduced by György Lukács and developed further by the Frankfurt School.

This ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ marked a clear progress. It helped to immunise against personalising views on Capitalist societies that can easily lead to forms of anti-Semitism, and views that focus on class struggle while ignoring the economical laws that shape it. Moreover, Robert Kurz, Roswitha Scholz, Ernst Lohoff, Norbert Trenkle, and other members of the journals Krisis 3)Cf. http://www.krisis.org/ (and, subsequently, EXIT! 4)Exit is a new journal founded mainly by Robert Kurz and Roswitha Scholz as a spin-off from Krisis in 2004 after internal disputes. Cf. http://www.exit-online.org ) have developed since the late 80s under the premises of ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ an important analysis of current capitalism. They see it as having reached its final structural crisis as the substance of value (and, thus, profit), human labour, becomes more and more obsolete with the ‘third technological revolution’, i.e. the massive introduction of microelectronic technologies since the 70s.

At the same time, it lead to an unproductive stagnation of Marxist German-speaking discourse. It became more or less cut off from international debates while having little influence on these debates itself. Marxist’ debates have become merely philological and self-referential. The rich analysis that Marx offers in the Capital has been reduced to a Neo-Hegelian cultural criticism, a purely negative critique that also lead to a political stagnation in large parts of the German-speaking radical Left. The probably most awkward manifestation of this is the ‘Antideutsche Bewegung’ (‘anti-German movement’) that abolished classical Communist policy at all in favour of aggressive Pro-Israel- and Anti-Islam-lobbying that corresponds well, all-too-well with the neoliberal economic policy (and its correlating cultural policy of diversity management and political correctness on the one hand, the ideological formation of a Western identity that defines itself against ‘terrorist’ or ‘fundamentalist’ forces on the other hand) of Gerhard Schröder and Angela Merkel. Leftist debates and politics have altogether become more or less completely culturalised and politicised and focused on issues such as queer feminism, anti-Fascism, anti-Racism, and anti-Islamism in the last two decades – a paradoxical, even absurd development if one bears in mind that at the same time the worst economic crisis in decades took place.

Achim Szepanski is – besides for example authors like Frank Engster (2014) and Harald Strauß (2013) – one of the few German-speaking authors who, frustrated by this dissatisfactory situation, have had the courage to come out of the German-speaking box in order to develop a (within a German context) completely new and even revolutionary reading of Marx and may in the long run lead to a re-economisation and re-radicalisation of German leftist politics. Possibly, the German radical left may be, after a long time of decline, a factor to be reckoned with again.

Moreover, the significance of Szepanki’s book does not exhaust itself within a mere German-speaking context. His book is of great importance for an international audience as well. Especially the politicisation and culturalisation under the influence of neoliberalism, i.e. the postmodernisation of the Left seem to be massive problem on a global scale.

II. Marx, Laruelle, Deleuze

The first volume of the trilogy, Marx’ Non-Ökonomie (Marx’ Non-Economics) deals mainly with a re-interpretation of Capital and the development of Szepanski’s philosophical and methodological premises. The freshness of Szepanki’s approach stems mainly from the fact that he – just like Marx himself – is not so much interested in philological nit-picking but uses his theoretical references as mere tool-boxes in order to reach a better understanding of the current situation. And – again just like Marx – he refers to the most innovative theories of his time. Among many others, these are mainly the Marxian critique of political economy itself (seen through the eyes of 150 years of discourse around it that Szepanski receives to an impressively large extent), the project of Non-Philosophy that François Laruelle has been developing for the last few decades, and the post-structuralist heterodox philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari.

II. 1 The Conception of Non-Economics

Obviously enough, the title ‘Non-Economics’ refers to Laruelle. The parts of the book on Laruelle are possibly the hardest to comprehend. However, the chapter on Laruelle, Das Konzept der Non-Philosophie (The Conception of Non-Philosophy), can be read on its own as an excellent introduction to Laruelle’s unusual thinking. 5)It has to be noted here that the same goes for every chapter of the books: They can all be read separately with great benefit. Just like Szepanski does not interpret Capital as a deductive book, he himself does not write in a deductive way. He shows himself being a good disciple of Deleuze and Guattari insofar as his books are not organised like a tree with a clear, single root but more like a meadow grounded with a network of multiple, interconnected roots, a ‘rhizome’. Any chapter can be taken as its centre. Moreover, he uses in a very Deleuzian way constant repetitions of certain conceptions and arguments as a means of development something new by little variations. While one can criticise this way of writing from a formalist point of view as being redundant, it is felicitous insofar as it reflects the content of the book and allows the reader to find his or her own way through the labyrinth despite of confronting it with one single, inflexible structure the reader has to adapt him-/herself. It is truly written like a tool-box. Szepanski is presumably the first German-speaking author who refers to Laruelle in great detail at all. What he essentially takes from Laruelle is an emphatic conception of ‘the Real’ which determines the world of human activities ‘in-the-last-instance’ (a term that Szepanki’s takes from Laruelle but which also reminds of classical Marxism) without being determined itself. Thus, there is no reciprocity in the relationship between human world and ‘the Real’, but a relationship that is purely one-sided: ‘The Real’ is that which grounds any human activity without being grounded itself. As such, it is never present itself but can only be grasped by interpreting the phenomena of the human world as its symptoms. Consequently, all attempts to interpret it are mere constructions which can make no claim towards ultimate truth. It can only proceed by consciously setting some basic axioms that are in the last instance political.

This assumption leads Laruelle towards the development of a ‘Non-Philosophy’ that completely avoids that which he sees as the major failure of any kind of classical philosophy including classical materialism: seeking an identical subject-object which can be used as a starting point for an absolute knowledge of the world. Philosophy does this by picking one particular phenomenon of conscious experience and declaring it to be the transcendental fundament for any experience and the fundamental principle of the world. Thus, any kind of traditional philosophy reduces the world to a subjective phenomenon – even traditional materialism as its ‘matter’ is still always-already ‘matter-for-a-subject’. Against this, Laruelle takes any kind of human knowledge as an equal symptom of the Real; his method is strictly realist, pluralist, and non-fundamentalist. Thus we see that Laruelle’s (and accordingly Szepanki’s) ‘non’ is not a mere negation but a ‘non’ comparable to the ‘non’ of non-Euclidean geometry: It does not only negate traditional forms of knowledge but integrates it within a more flexible, more comprehensive framework in which it is conserved as a special case.

The same goes not just for philosophy but for any kind of science insofar as any science seeks to seal off its realm of knowledge from other realms and to become absolute by taking mere special cases for the objective manifestation of the Real. Consequently, the goal of Szepanki’s work is to interpret our current world as a symptom of ‘the Real’. His basic axiom is that the Real of our current world is the process of capitalisation. It should be clear that this does not imply that his project is ‘economist’ in a traditional sense of the word. It is exactly ‘non-economist’ insofar as ‘the Real’ of that which is the object of standard economics is itself non-economic. Standard economics are therefore only one tool among many others in order to understand capitalist economy – they are a symptom of capitalisation itself.

II. 2 Capitalisation as a Process

Szepanski develops his conception of capitalisation under quasi-ontological premises that he takes from Deleuze and Guattari. The most important concepts in this respect are ‘the Actual’, ‘the Possible’, and ‘the Virtual’. In opposition to the Possible – which envelops only ‘possible possibilities’, possibilities that are abstract insofar as they merely could be actualised – the Virtual signifies a concrete Possible, possibilities that are already present in the Actual, actual possibilities. In this constellation, the Virtual possesses a quasi-ontological primacy: Things are not determined by what they are but by what they can be, i.e. what is within their power resp. what powers can take possession of them. Thus capital can only be understood as a process, namely: capitalisation, which is shaped by a certain virtuality or inherent tendency. It always transcends its material, immediate manifestations (means of production, money, gold, goods, workers …) towards something else.

II. 3 Capitalisation as Acceleration

In the rest of the first volume Szepanski develops in great detail how this process could be comprehended by using Marx’ Capital. Effectively, he turns the Hegelian reading of the Capital upside down: The first four chapters play little part in his interpretation. The analyses of the concrete capitalist process of production (including especially the large deliberations on modern technology), which Marx gives in the first, and that of the totality of capitalist circulation and financial capital, which Marx gives in the second and third volume of his work, are not seen as mere manifestations of the commodity form but the commodity form is interpreted in the light of the more concrete, more comprehensive phenomena. This casts a completely different light on it: While using it as a material and starting point of his own analysis, Szepanski deconstructs nearly every dogma of the ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’. He re-constructs Marx’ critique without referring to its ‘holy grails’, the Hegelian conceptions of fetishism and reification, at all, he shows the insolvable difficulties that occur when one wants to deduct the money form from the commodity form in a purely logical way, and he even shows that human labour is not the ultimate source of surplus-value but that there is a machinal surplus-value as well, and that the source of surplus-value has to be interpreted as the privatisation and exploitation of differences in general, not just the difference between paid and unpaid labour.

Especially the last point is crucial: It contradicts any theory of capitalist crisis (such as Robert Kurz’ that has been mentioned above) that supposes that automatisation is the worst problem, even the historical limit, of capitalism. Surplus-value can also be produced in a completely de-humanised production. Thus, Szepanski shows that traditional Marxist critique is based on a humanist prejudice: It is too optimist about capitalism insofar it thinks that capitalism is, in the last instance, a humanist project. Szepanski demonstrates that capitalism does not care about humanity, even the most basic survival of the human race, at all. Not de-humanisation, but on the contrary: humanity, is an obstacle to its development insofar as the human body is less effective than a robot (and a robot less effective than a mere algorithm). Capitalism is more nihilist than even Marx could have imagined in his worst nightmares.

Obviously enough, this point of Szepanski’s theory is also directed against the recent movement of Accelerationism – a thread of current Marxism that claims basically that Capitalism is an obstacle towards technological development and acceleration. 6)Cf. for example the Accelerate Manifesto for an Accelerationist Politics: http://criticallegalthinking.com/2013/05/14/accelerate-manifesto-for-an-accelerationist-politics/ On the contrary, the process of capitalisation (especially in its neoliberal mode of total unleashing) has to be understood as a process of radical acceleration with the speed of light as its only empirical borderline, and the self-sublation of time into mere space as its (of course impossible) virtual goal.

II. 4 Capitalisation as Financialisation

Thus, the basic movement of capitalism is pure tautological self-increase, profit for the sake of profit, acceleration of the process of accumulation at any cost its ultimate goal. Consequently, Szepanski demonstrates that the process of capitalisation has to be ultimately understood as a process of financialisation, that financial capital is the ‘ideal form’ of the accumulation of capital insofar it virtually has neither temporal nor spatial limits.

Traditional Marxist analysis already showed that any criticism of ‘financial capitalism’ as a separate phenomenon falls prey to a bad abstraction that can easily lead to reactionary forms of politics such as anti-Semitism. 7)This main claim of ‘Neue Marx Lektüre’ has been developed especially by Moishe Postone whose 1986 article Anti-Semitism and National Socialism has become a classic in German leftist circles. ‘Financial capitalism’ is no surplus-phenomenon that helps or even restrains ‘normal’ accumulation: It is an integral part of normal accumulation of capital, there will be no capitalism without credit, interest, derivatives and so on.

Szepanski goes one step further: Insofar as financial capital is the virtual force of capitalisation it is the dominating one. The sphere of financial capital is not, not even in the last instance, grounded in ‘real economy’; on the contrary, in the last instance real economy is based on the complex processes of financial capital. ‘Real economy’ is a derivative of financial economy, not the other way round.

III. Dystopia as Reality: Nihilism and Death of Man

In the second volume of his project, Non-Ökonomie des gegenwärtigen Kapitalismus (Non-Economics of Current Capitalism), Szepanki takes the step into the analysis of current capitalism under the mentioned premises. It is astonishing how much empirical material and theories from different schools he uses to underlie his diagnosis. Besides the already mentioned theoreticians he uses, to name just a few, Michel Foucault, Hans-Dieter Bahr, Günther Anders, Nick Land, Paulo Virilio, Maurizio Lazzarato, Niklas Luhmann, and Louis Althusser.

The already mentioned immanent dominating tendencies of capitalism have become manifest in a frightening way since the 70s. By and large, the thesis of Szepanski can be summed up in the sentence: Dystopia is now. ‘Real economy’ has already been substituted by financial economy in large parts, the acceleration of this economy has already reached unimaginable measures. At the same time, microelectronic technologies have absorbed and transformed traditional human life-world in a way that hardly anyone would have predicted and that Szepanski describes in the most drastic ways: Technology is by no means a means of human subjectivity any more but, on the contrary, human consciousness is becoming a pure means of technological processes that control it all the way down. At the same time, individuals (and also: companies, institutions, whole states …) are more and more integrated in the streams of financial capital by means of indebtedness. Culture, values, subjectivity, even ‘man’ itself ceases to exist in this new, entirely nihilist situation we are confronted with.

Here lies the true significance and provocation of Szepanski’s analysis. He shows that our current material situation puts into question the way we are traditionally accustomed to act and think on a most fundamental level. This relevance is not only philosophical but directly practical and political: How can we act on an individual or collective scale in a more and more post-human world that challenges the very conditions of possibility of action? How can we even think in such a world in which thinking is more and more substituted by machine computing?

From Szepanski’s point of view, what the Left in large parts does is more or less entirely obsolete and naïve: In a world that is almost entirely reigned by algorithms there is not much room for meaningful cultural criticism, arts, philosophy, theory, and even politics at all. It should be read as a soberly articulated but nonetheless passionate appeal: Forget all this hip deconstruction-/discourse-/aesthetics-/ethics-stuff, focus on the objective reality of our current situation and question the very relevance of all these nice things. The full, unhindered acknowledgement of this situation, how dark it may be, is the only way to change it – and to change it is the obvious aim of Szepanki’s project, however descriptive it presents itself.

Thus, Szepanski undertakes only the very first step of the complete re-definition of the leftist, or even: the human, project that is needed today. He develops neither a normative critique nor a political strategy nor a utopian counter-vision. But it is the most crucial step. It is a necessary book in a dangerous situation.

A third volume will follow in 2015 in which Szepanski will develop further his conception of technology. Possibly (and: hopefully) this volume will show some internal contradictions or breaks within current Capitalism, maybe ‘alignments’ in the sense of Deleuze/Guattari. 8)I thank Bart Zantvoort for his corrections not just on a linguistic level.

 

References

 

Engster, Frank 2014, Das Geld als Maß, Mittel und Methode: Das Rechnen mit der Identität der Zeit, Berlin: Neofelis.

Heinrich, Michael 2005, Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Eine Einführung, Stuttgart: Schmetterling.

Kurz, Robert 1999, Schwarzbuch Kapitalismus: Ein Abgesang auf die Marktwirtschaft, Frankfurt am Main: Eichborn.

Postone, Moishe 1986, ‘Anti-Semitism and National Socialism’, in A. Rabinbach and J. Zipes (eds.), Germans and Jews Since the Holocaust, New York: Holmes and Meier, 1986.

Reichelt, Helmut 2001, Zur logischen Struktur des Kapitalbegriffs bei Karl Marx, Freiburg im Breisgau: Ça Ira.

Strauß, Harald 2013, Signifikationen der Arbeit. Die Geltung des Differenzianten ‚Wert‘, Berlin: Parodos.

Fußnoten   [ + ]

1. This article is a longer version of a review I wrote for Marx & Philosophy. Link: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/reviews/2015/2050
2. As the founding text of ‘Neue Marx-Lektüre’ one can count Reichelt’s dissertation Zur logischen Struktur des Kapitalbegriffs bei Karl Marx (On the Logical Structure of the Concept of Capital in Karl Marx) (2001) from 1968, first published in 1970. It has become the standard reading of Marx within leftist German-speaking academia since the late 90s, important protagonists being the group around the mentioned Robert Kurz and his journal Krisis and Michael Heinrich, whose introduction into the Capital, Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Eine Einführung (Critique of Political Economy. An Introduction) (2005), first published in 2004, became the standard introduction to Marx’ Capital within few years.
3. Cf. http://www.krisis.org/
4. Exit is a new journal founded mainly by Robert Kurz and Roswitha Scholz as a spin-off from Krisis in 2004 after internal disputes. Cf. http://www.exit-online.org
5. It has to be noted here that the same goes for every chapter of the books: They can all be read separately with great benefit. Just like Szepanski does not interpret Capital as a deductive book, he himself does not write in a deductive way. He shows himself being a good disciple of Deleuze and Guattari insofar as his books are not organised like a tree with a clear, single root but more like a meadow grounded with a network of multiple, interconnected roots, a ‘rhizome’. Any chapter can be taken as its centre. Moreover, he uses in a very Deleuzian way constant repetitions of certain conceptions and arguments as a means of development something new by little variations. While one can criticise this way of writing from a formalist point of view as being redundant, it is felicitous insofar as it reflects the content of the book and allows the reader to find his or her own way through the labyrinth despite of confronting it with one single, inflexible structure the reader has to adapt him-/herself. It is truly written like a tool-box.
6. Cf. for example the Accelerate Manifesto for an Accelerationist Politics: http://criticallegalthinking.com/2013/05/14/accelerate-manifesto-for-an-accelerationist-politics/
7. This main claim of ‘Neue Marx Lektüre’ has been developed especially by Moishe Postone whose 1986 article Anti-Semitism and National Socialism has become a classic in German leftist circles.
8. I thank Bart Zantvoort for his corrections not just on a linguistic level.

12 Comments

  1. M. Steingass wrote:

    Nach dieser HurraBesprechung muss ich mich doch einmal zu Wort melden was Achim Szepanskis Kapitalisierung angeht. Ich schicke als Disclaimer voraus, dass Achim und ich am Blog Non zusammen gearbeitet haben und uns im Streit trennten.

    Ich habe die Kapitalisierung bis vor kurzem nur stellenweise überflogen und als Nicht-Marxist irgendwann ganz weggelegt, da es mir an Wissen mangelt, einschätzen zu können, in wie weit es hier wirklich um relevante marxistische Literatur geht. Es ist schliesslich auch ein Frage von Zeit und Energie als Newcomer in diesem Bereich alle neuere Literatur zu lesen und wirklich zu kennen und auch in den grösseren Zusammenhang einer langen Marxrezeption zu stellen. Allein aus diesem Grund wird das Studium derartiger Texte wohl auf kleine und leider irrelevante Zirkel beschränkt bleiben. Der Kapitalismus hat dem gegenüber schlicht den Vorteil, dass er sich permanent empirisch erprobt – und das auch noch mit falschen Theorien, wie Szepanski anhand der Black-and-Scholes-Formel herausarbeite – während die Idee des Kommunismus nach den Desastern der Vergangenheit erst noch wieder geboren werden muss und über keinerlei Praxis verfügt. Schon allein aus diesem trivialen Grunde hat ein Kommunismus (oder Sozialismus) wie man sich ihn in der deutschen Linken mehr schlecht als recht vorstellt keine Chance. Die Bücher sind einfach zu dick, die Zeit ist zu kurz und die Erklärer sind meistenteils unangenehme Besser- und Alleswisser.

    Mit der erwähnten Black-and-Scholes-Formel bin ich beim Thema. Kürzlich habe ich bei einer Durchsicht der Einführung zu Laruelle in Bd. I der Kapitalisierung (S. 55 f.) in einer Passage eine verblüffende Ähnlichkeit (ohne Quellenangabe) zu einem Text gefunden, den ich zwei Jahre vor Erscheinen dieses Bandes veröffentlicht habe. Das hat mich dazu angeregt, doch einmal die Passagen durchzugehen, von denen ich was verstehe. Da ich 20 Jahre als Portfoliomanager, Spekulant und Entwickler von Handlessystemen tätig war, verstehe ich ein bisschen was von Derivaten. Logisch also, sich zum Beispiel einmal Kapitel 7.3 aus Bd. II anzusehen: Futures und Options. CDS. Der Handel mit Risiken.

    Das Ergebnis dieser Stichprobe ist nicht dazu angetan der enthusiastischen Besprechung hier zu folgen. Der Text enthält eine Fülle von ungenauen oder schlicht falschen Aussagen, trivialen Erkenntnissen und Tautologien. Das Ganze ist zudem in einem Sound gehalten der eine hochkomplexe Materie suggeriert wo es zum Teil um recht schlichte Dinge geht. Gipfeln tut das zu allem Überfluss in einer echten Verschwörungstheorie. Ausserdem scheint der Schreibstil weniger rhizomatisch zu sein, als dass er eher dem Flow des Recherche- und Schreibprozesses zu folgen scheint – ohne dass noch einemmal eine Redaktion stattgefunden hätte, die Zusammengehöriges auch zusammengesetzt hätte. Letzteres hätte einer Linken, die es offensichtlich nötig hat, etwas über Finanzmärkte zu lernen, dieses Lernen erheblich erleichtert.

    Einige Beispiele.

    Es ist falsch, dass Spekulanten lediglich „0,01% des Nennwertes“ eines Futures zu hinterlegen haben (S. 124). Diese „Initial Margin“ kann man leicht googeln. Auch der Begriff Nennwert ist hier falsch. Man muss vom „Markwert“ eines Futures sprechen, demjenigen Wert den man effektiv mit ihm bewegt. Da die Initial Margin nur einen Bruchteil dieses Wertes ausmacht ergibt sich der Hebel. Im genannten Beispiel würde sich der irrsinnige Hebel von 10.000 ergeben. Eine normale Initial Margin liegt z.B. bei 1/10 oder 1/20 je nach Broker.

    In diesem Zusammenhang ist es auch falsch, dass „High Net Worth Individuals“ generell ihr Vermögen „gehebelt“ anlegen (S. 125). Theoretisch mögliche Hebel nutzen nur Anfänger, und zwar genau einmal, dann ist das Geld weg. Hebel werden von Vermögenden zur Geldanlage nicht generell genutzt. Das wäre aus verschiedenen Gründen Quatsch. An der gleichen Stelle ist auch falsch, dass es sich bei sog. sekundären Märkten um von den Börsen abgekoppelte Over-the-Counter-Märkte handele, die ohne übliche Kontrolle, Standardverträge und Restriktionen funktionierten. Das ist in jedem Detail falsch. Genauso wenig stimmt das in der gleichfalls auf dieser Seite in der Anmerkung Vermeldete, dass Hedgefonds generell nicht staatlich beaufsichtigt würden. Die Zeiten sind lange vorbei. Solche Bemerkungen sind eher altlinke Vorurteile à la die bösen Heuschrecken. Trivial ist dann die Schlussfolgerung (S. 126), dass man in diesen „hyper-kapitalisierten Räumen“ keine Waren kaufe, sondern sich in „tripetale Ketten von Geld-Geld-Transaktionen“ einklinke. Vor einem Viertel Jahrhundert, bei Eröffnung der ersten Deutschen Terminbörse (heute EUREX), hat man das auch schon gewusst – nur hat man es ohne ein solches Wortgeklingel sagen können. Und es geht weiter so. Trivial ist einiges mehr auf dieser Seite was in einem bombastischen Sound rüberkommt. Und warum zum Teufel soll Hedging der Vergangenheit zugewendet sein und die Spekulation der Zukunft? Warum wird dann noch gleich in einer Klammer die angeblich paradoxe Arbitrage abgehandelt? Der Eindruck der sich ergibt ist der, dass hier zum Teil Sachen einfach nicht verstanden wurden und/oder falsch referiert werden.

    Falls die Linke aus diesem Text lernen soll, was Optionen und Futures sind, was diese mit Spekulation zu tun haben und was hierbei ein paar grundsätzliche Sachen sind, die man wissen sollte, ist sie hier am falschen Platz. Grundsätzlich geht es um Risiken die abgeschätzt werden und die man versucht zu quantifizieren und die über Finanzmärkte verteilt werden, wobei es zu Heuristiken kommt die Märkte nicht richtig abbilden (siehe Normal Distribution vs. Skewed Distribution), die aber trotzdem auf eben diese Märkte zurückwirken. Das ist alles nichts Neues und man kann es wesentlich besser formuliert anderswo nachlesen. Dabei klingt der ganze Textabschnitt als habe die Entdeckung des Risikos gerade erst stattgefunden, und man müsse das unbedingt mitteilen, wo doch Risiko eines der fundamentalen Bestandteile solcher Märkte ist – untrennbar von Rendite und mit dieser immer im gleichen Hebel marschierend. Etwas was schon Tulpenspekulanten in Amsterdam wussten oder japanische Reishändler die vor Jahrhunderten hebelten, absicherten, spekulierten usw. „Die Selbstbeobachtung des Systems aus der Sichtweise des Risikos“ (S. 141) ist ein alter Hut. Aber es ist richtig, wenn die Linke das jetzt noch zu lernen hat, haben die ein Problem. Wenn schon aber sollte ein entsprechender Lehrtext in einer Sprache gehalten sein, die ohne unnötigen Bombast auskommt, der Trivialitäten mit heisser Luft aufpumpt.

    Ist das Black-Scholes-Model wirklich ein „Konzept zur Steuerung von Kontingenz“ (S. 140)? Ist sie tatsächlich ein Framing (ebd.) wie es in den behavioural economics beschrieben wird? Und wenn die genannte Formel z.B. erst 25 Seiten nach der ersten Erwähnung von Optionen erwähnt wird ist das schlicht verfehlte Didaktik und kein grosser Wurf. Das angeblich rhizomatische an diesem Text erscheint dabei als schlicht arbiträr und unlektoriert. Ja, der Text versucht zu erklären, wie Gefahr und Ungewissheit, zu Risiko, sprich Volatilität, wird und was das für Folgen hat. Aber er tut das in einer Sprache und in einer dissoziativen Weise mit unverständlichen Gedankensprüngen, dass man hier als Fachfremder sicher nichts versteht – und als einer vom Fach nur den Kopf schütteln kann. Besser wäre ein Reader mit Ausschnitten aus den angegebene Literatur als ein solches Referat.

    Gipfeln tut das Ganze dann, und das ist für den Kenner dessen um was es hier geht besonders happig, in einer kruden Verschwörungstheorie. Derzufolge sei die Subprime-Krise von „machtvollen Insidern“ angeblich „aktiv gestaltet“ worden. David Foster Wallace muss dafür als Beleg herhalten. Unversehens geht das Referat in reine Fiktion über (S. 144 f.). Was soll man dazu sagen?

    Das Problem ist folgendes: Wenn hier erkennbar geschludert, geworthubert und sogar in Verschwörungstheorien gedacht wird (und der Beispiele wären noch viele), wie weit ist es dann mit der Qualität der folgenden Kapitel her, in denen es richtig zur Sache geht mit z.B. „Ayaches Konzept der Kontingenten Forderung“ (S. 162 ff.) oder mit Deleuzes „synthetischem Wertpapier“ (S. 194)?

    Ich kann nicht sagen, dass alles was Szepanski in Kapitalisierung ausbreitet die schlechte Qualtität hat wie in dem Kapitel auf das ich mich hier beziehe. Das Problem ist, dass man eine kompetente Besprechung braucht, die wirklich die Qualtitäten heraus kristallisiert, wenn es welche gibt, und so potentiellen Lesern vermittelt, dass hier Wichtiges stattfindet. Eine Lobhudelei diese Besprechung hier hilft nicht weiter. insbesondere kann man auch nicht sehen was hier neu sein soll:

    By and large, the thesis of Szepanski can be summed up in the sentence: Dystopia is now. ‘Real economy’ has already been substituted by financial economy in large parts, the acceleration of this economy has already reached unimaginable measures. At the same time, microelectronic technologies have absorbed and transformed traditional human life-world in a way that hardly anyone would have predicted …

    … besonders im englischsprachigen Raum?

    Frank Engster hat bei einer Veranstaltung mit Achim Szepanski in Berlin im Mai sinngemäß gesagt, die Einführung über Laruelle in Bd. I sei zwar schon neu und innovativ, es sähe aber so aus, als ob der Rest nur referieren würde, was in der aktuellen Literatur schon längst gesagt worden sei.

    Wo bitte geht’s hier also zum Non-Marxismus?

    Donnerstag, 1. Oktober 2015 um 03:53 Uhr | Permalink
  2. Paul Stephan wrote:

    „Kürzlich habe ich bei einer Durchsicht der Einführung zu Laruelle in Bd. I der Kapitalisierung in einer Passage eine verblüffende Ähnlichkeit (ohne Quellenangabe) zu einem Text gefunden, den ich zwei Jahre vor Erscheinen dieses Bandes veröffentlicht habe.“

    Okay, Du wirfst Achim also mit anderen Worten ein Plagiat vor? Das ist schon harter Tobak, das müsstest Du schon genauer nachweisen.

    Den Rest deiner Kritik kann ich ehrlich gesagt nicht beurteilen, da mir die nötigen Fachkenntnisse fehlen. Ich habe versucht, die Kernthesen des Buches darzustellen und ihre Relevanz herauszustellen. Und ich glaube die Punkte, die ich genannt habe, werden von guten Teilen der theoretischen und politischen Diskussion der Linken tatsächlich nicht zur Genüge berücksichtigt.

    Eine reine Lobhudelei ist mein Text allerdings ja wohl nicht, vgl meine Kritik im letzten Abschnitt.

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 01:05 Uhr | Permalink
  3. Paul Stephan wrote:

    Also ich finde, die wichtige Frage, die das Buch aufwirft, und die eigtl überhaupt nicht richtig gestellt wird in der Linken ist, ob das Projekt der Linken (das sich wesentlich als kulturelles und politisches Projekt definiert) überhaupt noch Sinn ergibt, in einer Situation, in der Politik und Kultur tendenziell in Politik- und Kulturindustrie übergehen. Provokant gesagt: Womöglich haben selbst Debatten wie die augenblickliche um die Flüchtlingswelle realistisch(also: ökonomisch) betrachtet überhaupt keine Relevanz oder müssen ganz anders betrachtet werden, wenn man sie als Kollateraleffekt von Deterritorialisierungsbewegungen des Kapitals betrachtet. Dann erscheint nämlich das traditionelle Nationalstaatsdenken nur als Hindernis dieser Deterritorialisierung, das jetzt beseitigt wird – und die Linke wäre der willige Vollstrecker dieser weiteren Flexibilisierung.

    Ich will gar nicht diese Perspektive ergreifen, aber sie scheint mir doch ein wichtiges Gegengift dazu zu sein, die ökonomische Realität so krass auszublenden wie große Teile der Linken. (Wie ich sie wahrnehme zumindest.) Mich hat das Buch ja selbst krass zum Nachdenken gebracht in einigen Punkten und einige Dinge aus einer ganz anderen Perspektive sehen lassen.

    Deinen Verschwörungstheorie-Vorwurf finde ich da auch wieder zu reflexhaft. Zu behaupten, dass einzige Cliquen wirklich wirksam die globale Ökonomie steuern könnten, widerspricht doch diametral der Kernthese des Buches. Viel eher ist der quasi-automatisierte ökonomische Prozess das entscheidende Movens der Bewegung. Dass es umgekehrt solche Cliquen nicht trotzdem gibt gänzlich zu leugnen, ist dagegen auch wiederum zu einseitig und in dem Punkt scheint mir Achim doch klar ein wichtiges Moment der Realität zu benennen. Wir sind doch umgeben von Verschwörungen (im Plural – natürlich nicht von der großen einen konzertierten Super-Verschwörung).

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 01:21 Uhr | Permalink
  4. Paul Stephan wrote:

    Man müsste allerdings – wie Du es ja implizit tust – tatsächlich die Frage dahingehend zuspitzen, ob Theorie nicht ebenso in Theorie-Industrie übergeht bzw. längst übergegangen ist und das dann auf die Bücher von Achim selbst anwenden.

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 01:32 Uhr | Permalink
  5. Matthias wrote:

    Hallo Paul

    #2

    Plagiat

    Ich spreche von einer fehlenden Quellenangabe. Sowas lässt sich korrigieren.

    Den Rest deiner Kritik kann ich ehrlich gesagt nicht beurteilen

    Ich kann auch Teile der Texte nicht beurteilen. Ich habe etwas zu einem Teil gesagt, wo ich das kann, und da fällt das Urteil nicht günstig aus.

    Lobhudelei

    Ja, das hätte ich höflicher formulieren könne aber „the very first step of the complete re-definition of the leftist, or even: the human project that is needed today“ ist doch sehr weit gegriffen. Dass die sogenannte Linke in Bezug auf die Kapitalisierung des gesamten Planeten ausser „Hilfe die Heuschrecken kommen“ nichts zu bieten hat ist klar. Und es mag auch sein, das Szepanski da eine wichtige neue Front aufmacht. Aber wie man die Linke so kennt, wird es bei einer Front mehr bleiben, in einem linken Bürgerkrieg jeder gegen jeden. Zu Themen wie Big Data, Data Mining, die Korrelierung des „Dividuums“ entlang derart neue entdeckter Korrelationen, konnte man schon vor Jahren in Publikationen wie etwa Foreign Policy lesen. D.h. die Linke zerfleischt sich weiter und rätselt über Die Idee des Kommunismus, während das Kapital sich weiter praktisch erprobt – bis hin auf seinen eigene Extinktion… die dann mit der Linken auch endgültig Schluss machen wird. Fertig mit „the human project“. (Nein, natürlich nicht ganz, aber lassen wir das.)

    Wichtig ist deine Einordnung in die Marxrezeption:

    Achim Szepanski is […] one of the few German-speaking authors who […] have had the courage to come out of the German-speaking box in order to develop a (within a German context) completely new and even revolutionary reading of Marx and may in the long run lead to a re-economisation and re-radicalisation of German leftist politics.

    Ja, diese Reradikalisierung wäre wohl nötig. Die Frage bleibt, ob Szepanskis Projekt wirklich „revolutionär“ ist?

    #3

    Deinen Verschwörungstheorie-Vorwurf finde ich da auch wieder zu reflexhaft.

    Was ist daran reflexhaft? Bitte mal die entsprechende Passage genau lesen. Eine derartige Verschwörungstheorie widerspricht sogar Szepanskis eigener Sichtweise (wie du ja sagst), wenn er von Deterritorialisierung ausgeht und einem Dispositiv in dem der Aktant nur noch Dividuum ist. Vielleicht gibt es Institutionen oder Geflechte von Akteuren (algorithmischer und biologischer Natur) in diesem Dispositiv die mehr Macht haben als andere und bessere Renditen erzeugen als andere. Das aber müsste man tatsächlich anhand von Daten zeigen – wieviele der „Insider“ tatsächlich das erzeugen was man Alpha nennt (überdurchschnittliche Renditen) – anstatt mit einem Verweis auf Foster. Ansonsten ist der Abschnitt einfach nur die Beschreibung eines FeedbackMechanismus. Dessen Timing zur Erwirtschaftung von Renditen kann per Definition niemand in den Griff bekommen, weil es sich um ein nichtlineares System handelt. Im Übrigen sind die Renditen die z.B. im relative sehr kurzen Zeitraum der vergangen Jahren erzeugt wurden, Ergebnis massivster Stützungsaktionen. Deren GrossErgebnis wohnen wir gerade bei – in Form einer sich neu ausbildenden Blase. Ohne diese Aktionen gäbe es auch kein Alpha. Was Szepanski in diesem Abschnitt beschreibt ist im Prinzip der feuchte Traum eines jeden Traders: Buy bottoms, sell tops, call every market turn, make easy money. Tatsächlich ist das alles aber genauso stupides Geacker wie alle andere ‚Arbeit‘ auch und die Renditen die langfristig (über Jahrzehnte) mit diesem Geacker im Markt – im Durchschnitt über alle Marktteilnehmer – erreicht werden, liegen ca. bei 5% brutto. Das wiederum muss man in Relation zur Volatilität setzen. Der DAX z.B. hat über die letzten 10 Jahre im Durchschnitt eine von grob 25% . D.h. Mit der gegeben langfristigen Rendite erreicht man rein rechnerisch auf Jahressicht mit 90%iger Sicherheit eine Rendite zwischen +55% und -45% (was übrigens auch der Grund ist, warum sogenannte High-Net-Worth-Individuals bei der Vermögensanlage keine Hebel einsetzen (vgl. meine Bemerkung dazu bezgl. S. 125), das ist eine einfach Rechenaufgabe). Wenn man natürlich nur das oberste Perzentil ansieht, sieht man nur lauter Supertrader und „Insider“ die irgendwie irre Kohle machen. Wenn man allerdings betrachtet mit welcher Konstanz dieses Kohlemachen betrieben wird, setzt schnell die totale Ernüchterung ein. Eine solche selektive Betrachtung (oberstes Perzentil, Dezeil etc.) ist eine Form restrospektiver Historiographie, die das (scheinbar) Gegebene in die Vergangenheit projiziert. Es gilt also, diese besagten „Insider“ anhand von harten Fakten zu belegen. Bis dahin kann ich als Praktiker die nur als Mythos bezeichnen – als einen Mythos der zur Verschwörungstheorie mutiert, wenn man ihn für real hält.

    Warum dieser Mythos bei Szepanski auftaucht, obwohl das doch „diametral der Kernthese dieses Buches widerspricht“, ist eine gute Frage!

    #4

    ob [diese] Theorie nicht ebenso in Theorie-Industrie übergeht

    Guter Punkt…

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 07:44 Uhr | Permalink
  6. szepanski wrote:

    man muss halt schon genau lesen.die passage vom aktiven trendsetter bezieht sich auf nichts anderes als den hype-Koeffizienten von bichler/nitzan. „Wenn man mit Bichler/Nitzan nachvollziehen
    will, dass Renditen und Vermögen wesentlich durch zwei Faktoren bestimmt werden, nämlich der Relation zwischen ex ante erwarteten zukünftigen Renditen und den ex post Renditen künftiger Gegenwarten plus dem sog. Hype-Koeffizienten,
    der ex post den sog. kollektiven Irrtum der kapitalistischen Akteure hinsichtlich ihrer Fähigkeit zur Preisbestimmung repräsentiert, dann sind es bezüglich des letzteren gerade die machtvollen Insider, die nicht nur in der Lage sind,den Hype einigermaßen exakt zu identifizieren, sondern dessen Trajektoren und Verlaufsformen im Zuge der Kapitalisierung auch aktiv zu gestalten.“ aber das ganze ist viel zu emotionalisiert, als dass es hier etwas bringen würde.

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 02:19 Uhr | Permalink
  7. szepanski wrote:

    um es mit milios zu sagen,diese aktive gestaltung ist teil einer ideologischen repräsentation…die aussage frank engsters in berlin war exakt die, dass ihm der zusammenhang von non-marxismus und non-ökonomie nicht klar sei.er sagte nicht, dass bezüglich des letzteren alles gesagt worden sei,sondern dass ich eine akademische diskussion vorführe. and so on

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 02:42 Uhr | Permalink
  8. szepanski wrote:

    zum hebel. in der tat hätte es 1% des nennwerts heißen müssen. das ist dann ein sehr hoher hebel,den man bei cfds durchaus vorfindet. ansonsten bewegen sich hebel in der spanne von 2-400. das ist eben dann eine frage empirischer studien. eine sehr hedgefonds freundliche studie zb hier.https://www.institutional-money.com/magazin/theorie-praxis/artikel/hedgefonds-ungefaehrlicher-hebeleinsatz/

    Freitag, 2. Oktober 2015 um 03:26 Uhr | Permalink
  9. M. Steingass wrote:

    re #6

    man muss halt schon genau lesen

    Mach ich. Die entsprechende Passage beginnt mit dem Absatz S. 142 unten und geht bis S. 146 oben. Ich bleibe bei dem was ich gesagt habe. Das Kapitel trägt mit stark verschachtelten über langen Sätzen komplex wirkende Trivialitäten vor, enthält Fehler, Ungenauigkeiten, eine Verschwörungstheorie à la Finanzmärkte werden „von denen da oben“ manipuliert und, wie man in der genannten Passage feststellen muss, nicht gekennzeichnete, teils wörtliche Abschriften/Übersetzungen aus anderer Literatur.

    1) Der Abschnitt besteht aus lediglich 15 Sätzen. Diese Sätze sind z.T kaum lesbar, es sei denn man dröselt sie mühevoll auf.

    2) Es gibt, trotz einer Vielzahl von deskriptiven Aussagen lediglich 3 Literaturangaben von denen eine von einem Prosaautor stammt. Wo kommt das Material her? Vgl. z.B. Aussage über die FED S. 143.

    3) Trivialitäten: Die Theorie vom effizienten Mark beispielsweise ist, erstens, schon lange in ihrer kruden Form nicht mehr anerkannt, wurde, zweitens, durch verschiedene Autoren ausdifferenziert, wird, drittens, von Markteilnehmern die messbar Kohle machen müssen wenig beachtet, spiegelt sich im Markt zwar wieder, aber eben nur zeitweise (was zu den bekannten Problemen mit bsplw. schwarzen Schwänen führt). Die krude Form dieser Theorie ist ein Relikt aus einer Zeit als man heuristisch annahm, Renditen seien Normalverteilt, man aber nicht das Instrumentarium hatte, das zu prüfen. Sie ist heute meines Wissens in verschiedenen Varianten entsprechende angepasst. Im Prinzip fehlt hier bei Szepanski eine entsprechende Diskussion oder der Verweis auf eine solche.

    4) Für Behavioural Economics gab es 2002 einen Nobelpreis (glaube das war Thaler und ??). Besonders nach der der damals gerade geplatzten dot.com-Blase wurde das plötzlich in weiten Bereichen rezipiert. An der Uni Mannheim gibt oder gab seit vielen Jahren einen entsprechenden Lehrstuhl.

    5) „Trendchasing“ S. 144 ist ein weiteres Beispiel für eine Trivialität die in einem Monstersatz unter gebracht wird, der irgendwie alles und nichts behandelt (bitte halt mal genau lesen). Trendchasing heisst auf gut Deutsch ganz einfach Trendfolgen, tut genau das was das schlichte Wort sagt und ist eine der ältesten, einfachsten und unter gewissen Umständen profitabelsten Techniken.

    6) Der Hype-Koeffizient hört sich zwar hipp an, ist aber auch was ganz Einfaches. Es ist der Quotient aus erwarteten und derzeitigen (Unternehmens)Ergebnissen. Der Satz im dem er drin steht klingt so irre wir der Hype-Ko trivial ist (vgl. S. 144), bitte halt mal genau lesen.

    7) Die Verschwörungstheorie bleibt uns erhalten, denn

    8) sie steht genau so auch bei Bichler/Nitzan in Capital as Power S. 188 ff. (Ich kann nicht auf etliche Wenn-und-Aber eingehen, die man hier anbringen müsste. Fakt bleibt: Wenn man davon ausgeht, dass Finanzmärkte zumindest zeitweise nichtlineares Verhalten zeigen, dann ist Prognostizierbarkeit und Manipulation ausgeschlossen.)

    9) Bichler/Nitzan führen für ihre Behauptung darüber, dass „more sophisticated insiders“ quasi Geld drucken können, das sie Trends auslösen, beenden und drehen können (soweit mir ersichtlich) keine Belege an (vgl. S. 191 in Capital as Power). Hier gilt das Credo: Fakten, Fakten, Fakten und ansonsten Klappe halten! (Ich weiss nicht was Pichler und Pizza sonst so drauf haben aber diese Passage ist ein Schuss in den Ofen).

    Dass es – natürlich – in unserem MarktDispositiv eine Vielzahl von Kräften gibt die Preise trotz Nicht-Linearität beeinflussen, manipulieren, ausnutzen etc. pp. bleibt – natürlich – unbenommen. Aber das ist auch wieder eine Tautologie.

    10) Die Verschwörungstheorie von Bichler/Nitzan taucht wiederum zum Teil wörtlich in der entsprechenden Passage bzgl. des Hype-Koeffizienten S. 144 f. Kapitalisierung Bd. II auf. Hier hätte sich womöglich doch eine kleine Quellenangabe angeboten.

    Samstag, 3. Oktober 2015 um 05:49 Uhr | Permalink
  10. szepanski wrote:

    die sog. verschwörungstheorie von bichler/nitzan ist eine machttheorie, die dargestellt, aber im buch mehrmals kritisiert wird. vllt bist die unangenehme person, die alles besser weiß.ich höre mit diesem beitrag mit der sog. diskussion auf. das hier ist nur üble nachtreterei.

    Samstag, 3. Oktober 2015 um 10:34 Uhr | Permalink
  11. szepanski wrote:

    eins doch noch. wer die bücher gelesen hat, der weiß, dass der hype-koeffizient an anderer stelle mit quellenhinweis besprochen und kritisiert wird, und der nimmt auch den ironischen unterton, mit dem auf s.144f gearbeitet wird, wahr. deswegen der hinweis auf dfw. der bedingungen setzende kontext für die sog. insider lässt sich natürlich nicht aus deleuzes begriff der deterritorialisierung herleiten, sondern aus dem kapitalverhältnis, siehe den titel des buches. eine verschwörungstheorie hier raulesen zu wollen, ist geradezu widersinnig.fakten, sicherlich haben sie in einem ökonomischen modell nichts zu suchen, dieses ist nämlich quasi-tautologisch.kann man in joncas` laruelle interpretation nachlesen. so ließe sich gegen diese art der kritik weiter anschreiben, deren motive, wie gesagt andere sind.

    Sonntag, 4. Oktober 2015 um 04:10 Uhr | Permalink
  12. M. Steingass wrote:

    Von „Nachtreterei“ und „anderen Motiven“ zu sprechen, entkräftet nicht meine Einwände und ist die billigst vorstellbare rhetorische Retourkutsche.

    Was die „Machttheorie“ angeht, wo sind die Quellenhinweise?

    „Dass der hype-koeffizient an anderer stelle mit quellenhinweis besprochen und kritisiert wird.“ Wo?

    Was die Fakten, den Hype-Koeffizienten, Insider und das angeblich Tautologische angeht. Es ist keineswegs letzteres, wenn man fordert, dass solche ein Theorie ex post anhand von Daten auf ihre Belastbarkeit geprüft wird (nur dann könnte man auch ex ante mit ihr arbeiten). Das hiesse weiter dann auch nur eine simple Beschreibung dessen abzuliefern, was sich auf der Oberfläche abspielt. Das ist noch lange keine Theorie des Dispositivs.

    Ansonsten, ich habe genug Hinweise gegeben, die deutlich machen, dass ein skeptischer Blick auf dieses Werk nötig ist. Das Ergebnis ist, soweit das nicht den hier besprochenen Teil angeht, offen. Paul sagt in seiner Besprechung, man könne das Werk überall zu lesen beginnen. Also bitte, man möge je nach Kompetenz Textteile wählen und begutachten.

    Sonntag, 4. Oktober 2015 um 09:08 Uhr | Permalink

Posten Sie ein Kommentar.

Ihre Email-Adresse wird niemals veröffentlicht oder geteilt. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.
*
*